How to Introduce a Rescue Dog into the Family

Photo by Helena Lopes on Pexels.com

There are so many dogs that need new homes and families who have the homes and hearts to take them in. However when the family already owns a dog/s it’s not as easy as just bringing home a new dog and thinking it will run smoothly. Below are some helpful tips to introduce a rescue dog into the family

Make sure you are ready for another dog.

  1. Being ready finically is a necessity before bring in another dog. Since you have to pay for the dog and everything that comes with the dog.
  2. Make sure resident dog/s are already established. It can take up to a year for a dog to fully feel at home and understand the rules in the house.
  3. Fix all bad habits of resident dog/s before bringing in a new dog. Whether if it is leash pulling, excessive barking, nipping or jumping on people the bad habit can become worse and harder to break when a new dog is added to the mix.

The finding the right dog

  1. Find a dog that’s personality matches your family. A lazy basset hound wouldn’t work well in a high active family. While a hyper dog wouldn’t work well with a resident dog/s that is a couch potato.
  2. Two dominant dogs will not work together because they will be fighting for control, so one dominant and a submissive dog work well together. However you don’t want to have a dog that will be a bully to the other dog/s. If they are keeping a dog from you, not letting them into a room, not letting them eat or drink then they are being a bully dog.
  3. Some male dogs don’t do well with other male dogs. While females usually do well together. Old dogs can become aggressive with puppies who have high energy.

The first introduction

  1. Try to meet at a neutral setting
  2. Keep all dogs on a loose leash. Being on a loose leash will make it easier to help control the situation, while letting the dogs can come and go from the interaction.
  3. Try to let them meet nose to nose first then let them sniff each other. Some dogs do not like to have their butts sniffed. Meeting nose to nose helps the dogs see each other and feel more comfortable.
  4. Look for any signs of uncomfortable and hostility
  5. Have a half hour to an hour blocked out
  6. Take the dogs for a together to see how they will interact with noises and distractions.

Off the leash.

  1. Let dogs play in a fenced in yard with room to run
  2. Let dogs figure out how to play together and who is dominant/ submissive, some growling and biting may take place.
  3. Be ready to jump in if things get out of hand.
  4. Give dogs time to themselves so they can have a break, and each gets alone time with you.
Be prepared to punish both dogs. Do not let bad behavior slip through just because of the new dog / new environment. Letting the dogs know who really is in charge will help keep bad habits under control.
Finally know that it can take up to two weeks for dogs to fully get along and work together. There will be times like most siblings when the dogs will dislike each other just let them figure it out and be ready to step in.

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